The Sanest Tweet on the Zainab Rape Murder Incident

Source: Express News

There is really nothing much to say about the Zainab rape murder incident. It’s just a shock. You can’t unsee her pictures everywhere, you can’t unsee her abused corpse and you can’t make this dull pain and strange guilt go away. You can’t make the anger go away either. But at least you can know better and not emulate the savagery of her rapist-murderers and start calling for public executions in the manner of Iran and Saudi Arabia and start tackling. It’s just symptomatic of people looking for a head. Though for a change, you didn’t have to try hard to convince most Pakistanis that it was morally outrageous.

So this is all that needs to be noticed on this day of chaos and madness and emotional distress. This is the sanest thing said on this day. Sort of brings the Nirbhaya episode to mind.

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Let me write it down in case this tweet gets deleted.

“The people who criticised lawyers defending Mumtaz Qadri were as silly as those who will criticise the lawyers who defend the rights of the Kasur rape accused. The rights of all accused must be defended, no matter how certain society and talk show hosts are of their guilt.” – @SalmanARaja

The rest of the nonsensical noise you can afford to ignore.

 

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Remembering Benazir Bhutto… A Dark Night Ten Years Ago

Source: AP Photo/B.K.Bangash

Being just a mile away from that fateful occurrence… I recall that night ten years ago.

I recall the 27th of December, the darkest of nights…

It struck our hearts like thunder.

She was meant to shine like the sun that day.

But went down to leave a dark void forever.

Who cares what day it was? Who cares where you were?

You knew that there was rioting on the streets and that you somehow had to save yourself from it…

That you had to save your car or bike from burning… (Not that I had one, or will ever have one in a decade…)

But our minds were too numb to think about that.

The nations’ mind was too numb to think about that.

Somebody else was doing the rioting and the looting.

Our country was burned and looted the moment we saw her fall.

It felt as if something was lost… Something precious… Something that would never to return to us…

It felt as if someone was lost.

Someone you wished you had met just once…

Someone you wished you had known only for a while…

Life is not fair… Did not even let us the chance to hear her again…

To see her again…

To meet her…

Even when we were in the same town as she was… The same street virtually, before they pulled the trigger…

Before that bomb went off…

With it died so much more than her…

With it died our hopes and dreams…

Everything, we believed in. And it wasn’t much to begin with..

 

Not that we knew this when we were younger, stupider, naïver…

But now we know that we may never have the likes of her again in our lives…

We may never ever see what leadership like that means with this nation ever, ever again…

This meant that we may never hear from her again ever, ever again…

The End.

 

Thank you for choosing us to lead.

We may not have been strong enough to save you, or value your leadership.

But let us hope that we are able to honor you in your death.

Let us hope we have this much of human decency left…

The Perfect Representative of Our Collective Morality

Source: Youtube Channel

It probably would not be a harsh exaggeration, if you compared the collective moral state of the people of Pakistan with that of the Apartheid South Africa, the American South when slavery was practiced and even Nazi Germany. These analogies, if you consider them so, sound very harsh and damning. However, when you see otherwise reasonable and probably morally well aware Pakistanis defend the discrimination against Ahmedis like rabid dogs, you probably don’t see it that way anymore.

How can the Pakistani Muslim people, such beautiful, loving, compassionate people be so brutal at heart? Well, the extent of an evil is trivialized when it is diluted over such a humungous demographic. It is almost shocking if you look at the real degree of this problem. It is truly remarkable how a supposedly desirable trait can eat up all traces of your humanity like the termite.

Well, nothing brings forth the state of this collective social morality than the recent protest by a Khatam-e-Naboowat Group or Labaik Ya Rasool Allah Movement, a blockade protest that even the more pious of my friends have grown tired of. Some of them would mourn when the government will actually take violent action to remove them, which some of them are calling for so angrily. But what is even more hilarious is that people are actually visibly disturbed by this character Khadim Hussain Rizvi, the clear face of completely unwarranted Barelvi extremism in Pakistan.

The excuse is the paranoia that the Western powers and the nefarious Ahmedis are conspiring to change the precious Finality of Prophethood law. If you recall the parliamentary incident of the electoral amendment, exploited thoroughly by the opposition and the repulsive, corrupt Captain Safdar, the protesting Prophet-loving clerics are apparently behind the head of the “cleric committing the error.” You know what they mean by punishing the culprits, the lovers of the Prophet. Talk about unreasonable demands.

Listening to the brutal, heartless, vulgar and merciless message that the leader of this movement has to offer, it is a disappointment to link him to the human race. Especially when he insulted Abdul Sattar Edhi, a rare incident of selfless humanity in the brutal Pakistani history of bloodshed and selfishness. But perhaps this is what the human beings were supposed to come down to. But other than that, this is perfectly what the Pakistani people deserved to have.

Pakistani people proudly and absolutely love the 2nd amendment that has demonized Ahmedi citizens among their ranks. Now they must endure the curse of Khadim Hussain Rizvi as a token of this love they are proud of so much.

I look forward to life becoming even more miserable for Pakistanis.

Pause and Reflect

Source: The Star

You can’t believe you are alive, right?

Well, neither can I. I don’t understand what this world is. I don’t understand what our senses are. I don’t know what to make of this animal I see in the mirror every day.

Or rather the animal I avoid seeing.

I don’t know what to make of this world. I don’t know what to make of my relations.
And I don’t know what to make of the things I am supposed to do.

I just know that I am carrying on, pretending to be busy, to avoid looking at deeper things in life.

Oh, you have nerves of steel. Congratulations. You are not human.

Like you, like everyone else, I am deflecting the realities of life too. I am not any different.

You need a moment to pause and reflect. You need a moment to wonder.

Evasion is not a solution.

Numbing the pain is not health.

But we don’t want to change.

We don’t want to live.

We don’t want to die.

We just want to lie.

 

The Medicine for Apathy

Source: khybernews.tv

Can you lose the ability to sense the pain of other people, if only temporarily?

And does that always necessarily mean that you are an awful person?

A depressed prefrontal cortex under the influence can be a good excuse.

But what is the excuse for so many commentators failing to acknowledge the pain of protesters in Parachinar in response to the suicide bombings targeting the Shia community.

For refusing to accept the condition of the people perishing in the Bahawalpur oil tanker tragedy.

For wilfully overlooking the tragedy of the displaced Syrian people.

For ignoring the plight of the people of Gaza Strip deprived of water and electricity.

For being glad to see Mishal Khan die a painful death just because he said something offensive, which they say he didn’t.

Maybe there should be medicine for that.

But there is no good in passing moral judgment when you are guilty of the same.

Why pick and choose tragedies, just like the people you are pointing fingers at.

Why talk about people abroad when I don’t even sympathize with the person living next door.

Why would you want to save humanity if it is people that you just can’t stand.

The fact of the matter is that I do not remotely feel the pain and agony of all those people. Even if I try.

I don’t find in myself to be bothered enough to go out for the pain and loss of so many people.

And how many causes can you possibly choose.

 

Maybe there should be medicine for that.

 

The Incredible Humiliation of the Afterlife

Source: Hieronymous Bosch/wikiart

I started writing these lines surrounded by an environment of religiosity harassed by the thought of an afterlife, numbed by the sheer meaningless of life. Yes, the thought is horrifying, depressing, and gives an empty feeling.

But is this feeling of worthlessness and emptiness worth more than the condemnation of eternal existence?

Let us forget logic and reason for a moment. Let us suppose for a moment that humans would be subjected to an afterlife. As if the humiliation of one lifetime were not enough. And to add insult to injury that there would be a higher being to judge humans and to either condemn them to hell or reward them with paradise.

While most people would not find a thought more appealing, would anything be more humiliating? Would they not be satisfied with the comfortable isolation of oblivion? Isn’t the curse of one life enough? It is horrifying how people are motivated to resort to absurdities enticed by such a prize.

It is horrifying how people are motivated to resort to absurdities out of the enticement of eternal life. And add the mythology of the Abrahamic faiths to the thought and it would horrify you even further. Because a God bestowing eternal life could as easily condemn you to the inferno, being as angry and jealous he sounds like.

And even if that is true, just imagine the humiliation of such an afterlife. Whether you are condemned to hell or awarded with the pleasures of paradise, the sheer humiliation of going through it would be unbearable. Would there be anything more insulting to the self-respect of a sentient creature?

There is no wonder that Eastern cultures with philosophies such as Buddhism have the concept of moksha to escape the carnal cycle of birth and death. With the caveat of existing in a higher state of consciousness. But it is like a cry out to protest the misery of the existence forced on every creature.

Does a part of me want to indulge in the promised delights of paradise and reunite with family and friends if there is a life after death? Yes. But there is a part of me that knows that existence involves pain and dread.

Wouldn’t they instead give anything to escape the horror of life? The horror of existence?

Would they force this misery on others?

Just Like in the Old Days…

Source: Dawn

What is a win but a number?
What is a loss but a figure?
Adding yet another digit to the evergrowing tally.
What does it mean after all?
That the people from here and the people from there spoke for the first time in years.
That our players hugged and shook the hands in the field.

That they helped out the injured from the other side.
That they applauded every time they played well.
Just like in the old days…

New friends were made in the stadium stands.
New names were learned which we never thought were real.
We saluted each other’s flag for the first time in years.
Across the fence, we could see each other’s faces after such a long time.
At least the taunts and jests felt human enough.
Not some distant babbling regurgitated by some noisy talk show host.
Sweetmeats were exchanged whether we won or lost.
Smiles were exchanged to heal broken hearts.
Just like in the old days…

Try to come and see us every now and then.
If only to beat us every time you are here.
Even if you never want to meet us when you are there.
It feels like home again.