The Student Solidarity March: Students Across Pakistan Are Waking Up

Source: Pakistan Today

The progressives students across Pakistan did it. They were not threatened. They were not deterred. They were not intimated… by the threats of authority, by the threats of the state establishment, by the threats of their conformist parents and teachers, and by the threats of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan.

Never in the living memory of the generations since the 70s, has such a large, broad, and vibrant secular, leftist crowd taking to the streets in Pakistan. It is the kind of student politics that I most certainly missed during my college days and was always looking for. I was looking for a platform to express my secular liberal views but were not finding any like-minded people, let alone allies around me. I am relieved to say today that so many of the young students today cannot say that. The struggle of the leftist activists in Pakistan has made its impact.

Students all across Pakistan, from Karachi and Sindh to Quetta and from Southern Punjab to Lahore and from Islamabad and Peshawar to Gilgit, students came out in great numbers. They made their presence felt and reminded the authorities of what to expect in the future.

The most beautiful part of the march was the participation of Iqbal Lala, the father of martyred secular student Mashaal Khan. Any such march is incomplete without saluting heroes such as Mashaal Khan who have become a symbol of resistance against Islamic fundamentalism and the tyrannical state of Pakistan who collectively murdered them.

 

The progressive students also revived the spirit of Bhagat Singh, an indigenous hero of the War of Independence against the British that the Islamic Republic has completely forgotten.

There still is a long, long way to go for us. This is only the beginning. Still, there were nearly not enough people coming out. Still, the numbers nowhere near matched the injustice and threats faced by the students, women, labor, and minorities in Pakistan. There is still a long way to the restoration of student unions in a country that only appreciates monolithic behavior. There is still a long way to go for improving access to education and better health, or even the right to life and dignity in most parts of Pakistan.

Most importantly, there is a long way to go before the secular left, socialists, and social democrats can become a considerable voting bloc in Pakistan. The ANP in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa has always been a start but it is somehow disconnected to the left in the rest of the country.

While many liberal friends were put off by the Marxist and revolutionary slogans in the march, they must never forget the bigger secular, democratic cause, In order for the struggle of the secular left to be more effective, broader coalitions need to be built without sacrificing the principles of social democracy. We are up against the dictatorship of the military establishment and the ignorant, obscurantist tyranny of the Islamic Republic, the ignorant rule of the PTI and conservative Punjab, and the violent Islami Jamiat Talba. It is in the best interest of all center liberals, secular liberals to progressive left and socialists to unite to build a secular coalition, just like in the recent Israeli elections where Kachol Lavan appeared as a major coalition.

Zia must be turning in his grave on this day because he did all in his power to destroy the left from reemerging. But on this historic day, it has. Who would have thought that these visuals would be possible in the 80s.

Congratulations, progressive students of Pakistan, you have made history.

You are waking up. You are alive.

The Mockery of the Law and Constitution

Source: The News

Probably never before in Pakistan have we witnessed such a reckless and irresponsible judge. A deluded man from the bureaucratic elite who considers himself to be a godsent Messiah for the people now stands on the edge of criminal violations of the Constitution of Pakistan.

There is an entire history of the ridiculous statements that he has made which has brought disgrace to the office of the Chief Justice of Pakistan. However, he sunk to a new low by threatening to try the dissenters who might resist the construction of dams under Article 6 or the charge of treason. He also added that he has “begun to study” the Article 6 of the Constitution.

He made these statements while taking action against water bottler corporations. While we wish that everyone from the elite bureaucrats would have such a bleeding heart for the common people, he can spare us his twisted sense of populist justice. He should instead run for office after he will thankfully retire, hopefully on the due date in January.

Considering the concerns about the Indus Delta shrinkage, it only makes sense for people to raise questions about the dams he so fiercely advocates. Dams can be environmentally disastrous and there are certainly better ecological solutions than the large and wasteful dams, which can adversely alter the natural flow of rivers.

The honorable Chief Justice even ups the ante by vowing to build the controversial Kalabagh Dam which has been the bone of contention in Pakistani politics for decades. Now whether that is the bureaucratic establishment’s way of reinforcing the Punjabi supremacy. However, it remains to be seen if the unspoken military establishment has yet become strong enough to force the construction of the Kalabagh dam despite the protest from Sindh and the ANP.

But you wonder when is enough going to be enough. You wonder when will people have enough of this insane man at the helm of the highest judicial body in the country. You wonder when people will start challenging his nonsense. Which is particularly becoming difficult with a spineless Prime Minister paying tributes to his dam fund and has actually called for donations for building the dam himself.

Where is the outrage?

Where are the protests? Where are the dharnas?

We either are too afraid to see the inside of a local jell cell or probably we all have just stopped believing in Pakistan.

There is no reason why both can’t be true.