“Indus Blues” Premiere Held at PNCA Islamabad

Source: facebook.com/IndusBluesfilm

The feature documentary “Indus Blues” was finally premiered in Islamabad on June 14. I have had the good fortune of collaborating as a screenwriter and associate producer with director/producer Jawad Sharif and creative producer Arieb Azhar on this project, including many friends and colleagues from FACE including Zeejah Fazli and Mehnaz Parveen, and Asmat Bashir, Asif Ali, and Muhammad Qadeer from Bipolar Films.

All of those team members were there, with the exception of Arieb who is off for a tour to Europe and North America. The main guest who made the event possible was the German Charge d’Affaires Dr. Jens Jokisch, who is also the acting ambassador. He expressed his fondness for Pakistan and its culture and was glad to be the partner for the event. Senator Faisal Javed Khan and PNCA Director of Film Aijaz Gul also attended the event.

Source: facebook.com/IndusBluesfilm

The highlight of the event was the presence of one of the cast members, Boreendo metro Faqeer Zulfikar, who also appears on the poster of the film. He initiated the mood of the film with a couple of folk tunes on Boreendo and Damburi, but it somewhat took away the surprise and the marvel of the discovery of the Boreendo in the film.

I was anticipating a far bigger turnout but the fact remains that the general public does not care as much about the subject as you would like them to. But still, it was good to see people who value folk music and independent cinema turn up in fairly good numbers.

Being a part of the “Indus Blues” team, I would like to thank all friends who came to the event. We would continue to take the message of the film to all corners of the country so the neglected voices of our folk musicians and craftsmen can be highlighted the way they ought to be.

I would like to thank the audiences in Pakistan and around the world. Please keep on supporting Indus Blues.

Art Langar: The Inception of a Ritual Festival

Source: Art Langar

Something extraordinary happened in Islamabad for the last two nights. A quiet city briefly came alive, and even though it has before, never like this. Never in such a grand Sufi manner. All thanks to Islamabad’s very own, and I am proud to call him that, Arieb Azhar.

Arieb Azhar is a very special person. He is sensitive about the society around him, mindful of the injustices, and somehow shockingly focused on positivity and bringing people together. There is enough hate to go around over here anyway, especially after weeks of a hateful sit-in protest by a religious party. Islamabad surely needed a break.

Art Langar, the new ritual festival of the artists of Pakistan, especially with a Sufi, spiritual and humanistic inclination, provided just that. Langar refers to the holy token food offered for free at a Sufi shrine, which primarily serves as enough for the day for the poor of the town. But it is not just reserved for the poor. A Sufi does not see class, caste, creed or color of the skin. The doors are open for everyone. And so were those of Art Langar.

I can’t say if loads of crowd visited the Art Langar but those who did were in for a treat. Art Langar mixes art with music performances, with a section reserved for art installations as well as the main auditorium serving as the venue for the musical performances of the featured stars. And they had quite a lineup.

Art Langar, the idea still being in its infancy is yet to achieve perfection in execution but more importantly, it seeks to initiate the trend of a gift economy in Pakistan, as well as the culture of buying tickets to support art as opposed to freeloading as is the norm.

The performing acts included the Shah Jo Raag Faqeers of Bhittai, Krishan Lal Bheel and his troupe, Mai Nimaani, Qawalistan, Farhad Humayun and the Overload, Khumarian, The Sketches, Akhtar Chanal Zehri, Makrani Lewa dancers, and the Mekaal Hassan Band, apart from Arieb Azhar himself.

But most appropriately, the festival concluded with the Dhamaal at the beat of the dhol of Pappu Saeen of the Shah Jamal Shrine, considering the theme of the festival and the Lal Shahbaz Qalandar chants just about after every act in a very non-religious way.

The purpose behind this festival was much deeper than the lineup of musical acts performing in it but I think we are going to take a few years, if the Art Langar team remains steadfast, to get there. All I hope is for Arieb Azhar to get encouraged enough to continue this journey.